Chicago, Illinois, US, vector map Adobe Illustrator editable City Plan V3-2016.08, full vector, scalable, editable

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Vector Map Chicago, Illinois, US, vector map Adobe Illustrator editable City Plan V3-2016.08, full vector, scalable, editable, text format street names, 29 mb ZIPVector Map Chicago, Illinois, US, vector map Adobe Illustrator editable City Plan V3-2016.08, full vector, scalable, editable, text format street names, 29 mb ZIPVector Map Chicago, Illinois, US, vector map Adobe Illustrator editable City Plan V3-2016.08, full vector, scalable, editable, text format street names, 29 mb ZIPVector Map Chicago, Illinois, US, vector map Adobe Illustrator editable City Plan V3-2016.08, full vector, scalable, editable, text format street names, 29 mb ZIPVector Map Chicago, Illinois, US, vector map Adobe Illustrator editable City Plan V3-2016.08, full vector, scalable, editable, text format street names, 29 mb ZIPVector Map Chicago, Illinois, US, vector map Adobe Illustrator editable City Plan V3-2016.08, full vector, scalable, editable, text format street names, 29 mb ZIPVector Map Chicago, Illinois, US, vector map Adobe Illustrator editable City Plan V3-2016.08, full vector, scalable, editable, text format street names, 29 mb ZIPVector Map Chicago, Illinois, US, vector map Adobe Illustrator editable City Plan V3-2016.08, full vector, scalable, editable, text format street names, 29 mb ZIPVector Map Chicago, Illinois, US, vector map Adobe Illustrator editable City Plan V3-2016.08, full vector, scalable, editable, text format street names, 29 mb ZIPVector Map Chicago, Illinois, US, vector map Adobe Illustrator editable City Plan V3-2016.08, full vector, scalable, editable, text format street names, 29 mb ZIPVector Map Chicago, Illinois, US, vector map Adobe Illustrator editable City Plan V3-2016.08, full vector, scalable, editable, text format street names, 29 mb ZIPVector Map Chicago, Illinois, US, vector map Adobe Illustrator editable City Plan V3-2016.08, full vector, scalable, editable, text format street names, 29 mb ZIPVector Map Chicago, Illinois, US, vector map Adobe Illustrator editable City Plan V3-2016.08, full vector, scalable, editable, text format street names, 29 mb ZIPVector Map Chicago, Illinois, US, vector map Adobe Illustrator editable City Plan V3-2016.08, full vector, scalable, editable, text format street names, 29 mb ZIPVector Map Chicago, Illinois, US, vector map Adobe Illustrator editable City Plan V3-2016.08, full vector, scalable, editable, text format street names, 29 mb ZIP

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Vector Map Chicago, Illinois, US, vector map Adobe Illustrator editable City Plan V3-2016.08, full vector, scalable, editable, text format street names, 29 mb ZIP
All streets, some buildings. Map for design, printing, arts, projects, presentations,
for architects, designers and builders.
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Chicago, Illinois, US, vector map Adobe Illustrator editable City Plan V3-2016.08, full vector, scalable, editable, text format street names, 29 mb ZIP
All streets, some buildings. Map for design, printing, arts, projects, presentations,
for architects, designers and builders.
The most accurate and detailed map of the city.
CDR, DWG, DXF and other formats - on demand, same price, please, contact 

Chicago
City in Illinois
Chicago, on Lake Michigan in Illinois, is among the largest cities in the U.S. Famed for its bold architecture, it has a skyline bristling with skyscrapers such as the iconic John Hancock Center, sleek, 1,451-ft. Willis Tower and neo-Gothic Tribune Tower. The city is also renowned for its museums, including the Art Institute and its expansive collections, including noted Impressionist works.

Population: 2.719 million (2013)
Sports teams: Chicago Cubs, Chicago Bulls, Chicago Blackhawks

Chicago is the third most populous city in the United States. With over 2.7 million residents, it is the most populous city in the state of Illinois and the Midwestern United States, and the county seat of Cook County. The Chicago metropolitan area, often referred to as Chicagoland, has nearly 10 million people and is the third-largest in the U.S.

Chicago was incorporated as a city in 1837, near a portage between the Great Lakes and the Mississippi River watershed, and grew rapidly in the mid-nineteenth century. The city is an international hub for finance, commerce, industry, technology, telecommunications, and transportation: O'Hare International Airport is the second busiest airport in the world when measured by aircraft traffic; the region also has the largest number of U.S. highways and rail road freight. In 2012, Chicago was listed as an alpha global city by the Globalization and World Cities Research Network, and ranked seventh in the world in the 2014 Global Cities Index. Chicago has the third largest gross metropolitan product in the United States—about $630.3 billion according to 2014-2016 estimates. The Chicago metropolitan area is also home to several universities, including Northwestern University, University of Chicago, and University of Illinois at Chicago.

Chicago City limits

In 2014, Chicago had 50.2 million international and domestic visitors. Chicago's culture includes the visual arts, novels, film, theater, especially improvisational comedy, and music, particularly jazz, blues, soul, gospel and house music. It also has professional sports teams in each of the major professional leagues. Chicago has many nicknames, the best-known being the Windy City.

Area
• City 234.0 sq mi (606 km2)
• Land 227.3 sq mi (589 km2)
• Water 6.9 sq mi (18 km2) 3.0%
• Urban 2,122.8 sq mi (5,498 km2)
• Metro 10,874 sq mi (28,160 km2)
Elevation 594 ft (181 m)
Highest elevation
– near Blue Island 672 ft (205 m)
Lowest elevation
– at Lake Michigan 578 ft (176 m)
Population (2010)
• City 2,695,598
• Estimate (July 1, 2015[3]) 2,720,546
• Rank 3rd largest city in U.S.
Largest in Illinois and in the Midwestern United States
• Density 11,864.4/sq mi (4,447.4/km2)
• Metro 9,551,031 (3rd)
Demonym(s) Chicagoan
Time zone Central (UTC-6)
• Summer (DST) Central (UTC-5)
ZIP Code Prefixes 606xx, 607xx, 608xx
Area codes 312/872 and 773/872

Geography
Chicago's present natural geography is a result of the large glaciers of the Ice Age, namely the Wisconsinan Glaciation that carved out the modern basin of Lake Michigan (which formed from the glacier's meltwater). The city of Chicago itself sits on the Chicago Plain, a flat plain that was once the bottom of ancestral Lake Chicago. This plain has very little topographical relief, in fact, topographical relief is so unusual in the plain that what would be unnoticed hills and ridges in other locales have been given names. The highest natural point within the city limits is in the Beverly neighborhood at 41°42′12.5″N 87°40′37″W at 672 ft (205 m). In pioneer days, this hill was called Blue Island, so named because at a distance it looked like an island set in a trackless prairie sea. In fact it, and the nearby Stony Island, were both islands in Lake Chicago, as it receded. On the North side, the diagonals Clark Street and Ridge Boulevard run along ridges that were once sandbars in the Lake.

Chicago topographical relief
One special feature of the Chicago area was the now-vanished Mud Lake in the Des Plaines River watershed. During heavy periods of rain or when the Des Plaines overflowed its banks due to downstream ice dams in the early spring, the river would flow through Mud Lake to the South Branch of the Chicago River, forming a favorite portage for early traders and creating the path of the future I&M and Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canals. When the city we know today was initially founded in the 1830s, the land was swampy and most of the early building began on low dunes around the Chicago River's mouth. Indeed, Chicago's low lying geography, which ultimately became crucial to its boom town development (as the site of the Chicago Portage and canal), could not initially attract substantial early settlement because the tall grass prairie around its lake and river systems was underlain by hard packed glacial clay, making much of the area forbidding wetlands. Thus, the paradox of Chicago's development as a city in the 19th century became taking advantage of this geography, but also overcoming its limitations.

North of the city of Chicago, there are steep bluffs and ravines that run along Lake Michigan. In contrast, south of the city of Chicago into Northwest Indiana it is without bluffs, but instead has sand dunes. The greatest example of these can be seen at Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore, where some dunes reach up to almost 200 feet. Farther inland, a series of moraines surrounds the Chicago Plain. This surrounding area is hilly and higher than the Chicago Plain. Past the moraines, the land flattens out again, but is interspersed with a few deep river valleys such as the Illinois River, Fox River, Des Plaines River, and Kankakee River. Here you may find rock cliffs and rock ravines, which are absent from the interior Chicago area (the ravines of the north shore and south suburbs are soil ravines without any rock).

City limits of Chicago.
Also, a very large limestone quarry (Thornton Quarry) exists just south of the city of Chicago in the suburb of Thornton. It was once a coral reef when the Midwest was covered by a warm inland sea (hundreds of millions of years before the glaciation of the Chicago area). The rest of the Chicago area does not have bedrock this close to the surface.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicago

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A New Google-based Tutor/Mentor Program Locator!

The Tutor/Mentor Connection (T/MC) is excited to launch a new version of its online Tutor/Mentor Program Locator.

Since 1993 the T/MC has been piloting the use of a mapping technology – GIS (Geographic Information Systems) – to create tools that help build and sustain comprehensive mentoring-to-career programs in every high-poverty neighborhood in the Chicago area, while providing resources that excite volunteers, donors, and community leadership about their roles in supporting this process.

(Click on the map to see an enlarged version.)

In May 1994 the T/MC first published a printed Directory of volunteer-based tutoring and/or mentoring programs serving Chicago, and operating in non school hours. The Directory was sent to about 3000 business, foundations, schools, libraries each year until 2001. The T/MC began to put its strategy on the Internet in 1998, and posted the Directory in a searchable on-line Program Locator in 2004. Its web sites recorded more than 100,000 visitors and one million page views in 2008. A search of Google for "tutor mentor" brings the website up first among thousands of listings. The new Program Locator is the next logical step in this technological evolution.
While the original Program Locator could be searched for type of program, age group served, and zip code, with the results plotted on a Google map, the new Program Locator takes advantage of Google technologies to provide interactive access to all poverty, asset, and boundary data – the same map layers used by the T/MC mapping department when we make the maps featured in stories at http://mappingforjustice.blogspot.com/ and elsewhere on the Internet.
For those new to the concept of tutoring and mentoring, tutor/mentor programs are nonprofit facilities that offer one-to-one volunteer-student tutoring and mentoring services during non-school hours. The programs are vital to the success of college-minded and career-oriented students who are a little behind the curve due to inadequate school facilities and the challenges of high-poverty.
(Please note: There is a wide variety of organizations that offer volunteer-based tutoring and/or mentoring in the Chicago region. The role of the T/MC Directory is to help people know where they are, and how to contact them, rather than to judge which program is better than any other. Through other services of the T/MC, we seek to help each program get ideas, volunteers and resources to constantly improve and expand the quality and impact of their services. See more about this at http://www.tutormentorprogramlocator.net/ProgramLocator/disclaimer.asp )

Thanks to a generous donation received in November 2007, the T/MC hired me, Mike Trakan, in January 2008 to rebuild its desktop mapping capacity. If you scroll through the links on the side you can see the maps I’ve created since then, and articles that I’ve written to show people how they can use maps.
In each article, I use several different map images to illustrate my message. Each map shows different “layers” of information I have collected and mapped over the past year, using desktop ArcGIS software donated by ESRI. (Just a note: ESRI has been donating software to the T/MC since 1995. We would not have this capacity if these donations had not been provided.)
What’s special about the new Interactive Program Locator is that you are now able to create your own maps, very similar to the ones I make at the Chicago office of the Tutor/Mentor Connection.
In addition to plotting program locations, the new Program Locator offers a visual Google-style representation of T/MC data, highlighting relationships among existing programs, poverty, and available community resources.

With a T/MC mapping tool like the new Program Locator in hand, any community leader – from businesses, universities, hospitals, or churches for starters – can quickly zoom to a high-poverty neighborhood to see where programs are needed or missing completely. Leaders can then find geographic relationships among programs, themselves, and potential partners – and ultimately organize alliances that support existing programs or build new ones if needed.
You can review the features of the new Program Locator at http://www.tutormentorprogramlocator.net/Programlocator/TMCHelp.aspx
You can also review this animated presentation to learn more about the features of the new Program Locator: http://www.tutormentorprogramlocator.net/Programlocator/Intro.aspx
Of course, important features that were a part of the original Program Locator remain. Browse program locations to find addresses, phone numbers, contact names, hours of operation, age-group served, and website links. The new Program Locator simply offers you – the volunteers, donors, parents and youth – new depth, and an additional understanding of where support for tutor/mentor programs is most needed.

How are these maps to be used?

The articles I’ve written for the past year show how the maps can be used. I encourage you to read these. I also encourage you to read the articles Dan Bassill, President of the T/MC writes, at http://tutormentor.blogspot.com/.
We’re illustrating how maps can be used by business, religious, political and education leaders to mobilize resources that make constantly improving, volunteer-based tutor/mentor programs available to more of the children living in high poverty neighborhoods of the Chicago region. We’re demonstrating how leaders in other communities can use maps for the same purpose.
We’ll keep writing articles and creating new maps so please bookmark or subscribe to our blogs and use them as a training course for your own staff and community leaders. As you look at these maps, and articles, ask yourself these questions:
“What are the actions I or my organization can take to assure that every youth born in poverty today is starting a job and career by age 25?”
“How do we assure that there are great tutor/mentor programs in all of the neighborhoods where they are needed, rather than a few great programs in a few locations?”
“How do we help all of these programs have the resources and ideas that enable them to have a growing impact on helping kids move through school and into 21st century jobs and careers?”

To help get the creative juices flowing, Dan has collected and/or designed a bunch of strategy templates and documents which he shares in the Tutor/Mentor Institute at http://www.tutormentorexchange.net/

Please take a look at the new Program Locator and build your own understanding. Then please let us know what you think.

We want to know from you how you are using this tool. We also want to know what might work better.
Since we’re a non profit and have built this service with the help of volunteers and a few donors, we’re also looking for other people who will provide money needed to manage this service, and make the improvements that many of you will want as you begin to use the site.
Again, please post your comments below. And thank you for supporting tutoring and mentoring programs in Chicago! Source.

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Last Modified: March 5, 2017 @ 8:26 pm