Lenses change how the object area beneath the lens appears, not the actual properties and attributes of the objects. You can apply lenses to any vector object, such as a rectangle, ellipse, closed path, or polygon. You can also change the appearance of artistic text and bitmaps. When you apply a lens over a vector object, the lens itself becomes a vector image. Likewise, if the lens is placed over a bitmap, the lens also becomes a bitmap. The lens types applied to the original (far left): (left to right) Heat map, Magnify, and a Custom color map Lenses change how the object area beneath the lens appears, not the actual properties and attributes of the objects. You can apply lenses to any , such as a rectangle, ellipse, closed path, or polygon. You can also change the appearance of artistic text and bitmaps. When you apply a lens over a vector object, the lens itself becomes a vector image. Likewise, if the lens is placed over a Lets you simulate an additive light model. The colors of the objects beneath the lens are added to the color of the lens as if you were mixing colors of light. You can choose the color and the amount of color you want to add. Lets you view an object area with only black and the lens color showing through. For example, if you place a green color limit lens over a bitmap, all colors except green and black are filtered out in the lens area. Lets you change all the colors of the object area beneath the lens to a color ranging between two colors you specify. You can choose the range’s start and end colors and the progression between the two colors. The progression can follow a direct, forward, or reverse route through the color spectrum. Lets you change the colors beneath the lens to their complementary CMYK colors. Complementary colors are colors that are opposite one another on the color wheel. Lets you magnify an area on an object by an amount that you specify. The magnify lens overrides the original object’s fill, making the object look transparent. Lets you change the colors of object areas beneath the lens to their grayscale equivalents. Tinted grayscale lenses are particularly effective for creating sepia-tone effects. Lets you display the object area beneath the lens with the outline or fill color you choose. For example, if you set red for the outline and blue for the fill, all areas beneath the lens appear to have red outlines and blue fills. Source.


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Last Modified: July 29, 2014 @ 12:00 am