How to Create a Vector Outline With a Photo and Inkscape

If you work with digital photos or images, you've probably noticed that if you resize them to be larger, they lose resolution and either become pixelated or blurry. This degradation affects raster images, a category of image files such as JPEG, BMP, GIF, or PNG, all of which are based on pixels. If you convert that image into a vector image, however, it can be enlarged to a billboard and will still look as sharp as the original. This tutorial shows you how to use Inkscape to create a vector outline from any digital image. If you work with digital photos or images, you've probably noticed that if you resize them to be larger, they lose resolution and either become pixelated or blurry. This degradation affects images, a category of image files such as JPEG, BMP, GIF, or PNG, all of which are based on pixels. If you convert that image into a image, however, it can be enlarged to a billboard and will still look as sharp as the original. This tutorial shows you how to use Choose the size that you want the vector image to be. You can select from a list of standard page sizes or type in a custom width and height. This article will use 300x300. You do not have to hit Enter, just close the dialog box. tool in the column of tool icons on the left side of the workspace, or press F1. Click on your raster image until outward-pointing arrows appear at its corners. If you see rotational arrows, click in the middle of your raster image again. Click on one of the outward-pointing corner arrows and hold CTRL while moving the mouse diagonally to resize your raster image to the size of the vector image. Holding CTRL maintains the aspect ratio of the selected object. The traced paths should be somewhat similar to the shape, but they don't have to be exact. You will make adjustments later. Zoom in on the path you drew, and start editing. You will see many squares. Those are nodes that define the path. You won't need nearly as many as are there, so it's helpful to eliminate some of them. There are two ways to do this: the path. This is an easy way to eliminate excess nodes. Unless you are doing some really fine work, this method should be sufficient enough for you. You can use the Simplify command multiple times on the same selected nodes. As you can see, this one will need some tightening up. It was created using a trackball, so precision work was difficult. In this intentionally messed up image, the node is clearly visible. Moving the square will move its location, and moving the two circular extensions off of it will adjust its Bezier curve segments. You will have to experiment and read the Inkscape manual to get the hang of it. To get the basic shape of your image, move the nodes (squares) to the correct places before doing further adjustments. You will find yourself adjusting the curves, but moving the nodes first makes it easier. If you are good at using a photo editor, start with your image - using desaturation and maximization of the contrast, you will get a strong outline of your image ( ). Save it, import it into Inkscape, then choose menu Path >, Trace Image. Select Edge Detection, press Update, you should see the desired outline of your image. If it looks reasonable, press OK, wait until Stop is not active anymore, close this window. You should have the outline overlaid over the original image. Source. Looking for vector maps of Germany (Deutschland Vektorkarten) for Adobe Illustrator?."


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Last Modified: April 24, 2016 @ 12:30 am