mCADForums.com • Sketch from picture?

mCADForums.com is the online home for CAD professionals to discuss CAD, Design, Engineering, Technology and all things product development. I'm interested to hear what people have to say on this but I'm guessing the answer is no. In my experiences I have used programs like CorelDraw or Illustrator to recognize lines from images and then import the dxf's into Inventor. Inventor has made it much easier to trace images in the last couple releases though. I'm interested to hear what people have to say on this but I'm guessing the answer is no. In my experiences I have used programs like CorelDraw or Illustrator to recognize lines from images and then import the dxf's into Inventor. Inventor has made it much easier to trace images in the last couple releases though. yep... I have managed to do it in Corel, trace it... than save as DXF... but I thought it is possible to do it in Inventor... that would be just fine :) Images are usually bit maps, so there are no 'lines' as such to extract - only tiny squares of black/white (or colour...). If the image contains Vector base geometry, then you stand a chance. For example a Vector based PDF can be brought into AutoCAD, allowing you to 'snap' to the underlying geometry. Vector based PDF's can also be brought into image editing software, and then saved as DWG which can be imported into Inventor. I have to say though, the results that you get may not be easy to lock down parametrically - so it might be quicker in the long run to sketch it in Inventor yourself. I have inserted images into sketches, but not for the sake of vector recognition. Essentially, as I understand it, you have to have either a .dxf or .dwg format to insert into an Inventor sketch. More specifically, it has to recognize the vectors. i would also think that a 'picture' could have a lot more lines than necessary, and further more, you wouldn't want to have to constrain all that geometry. I have some jpg of whole product but without all dimensions... only the main dimensions... so I need model so I can create those parts... it is a little bit tricky... so what I did was, I said before, import in Corel ... make as vector ... and save it as dxf... than, in dxf scale it to proper dimensions... and import in inventor... ...so what I did was, I said before, import in Corel ... make as vector ... and save it as dxf... than, in dxf scale it to proper dimensions... and import in inventor... The unknown dimensions are kind of like solving a crossword puzzle. Some of them should be fairly obvious even numbers or fractions (depending on source/units) and the rest fall into place just like the unknowns in a crossword. I agree with JD. You can trace over the drawing in Inventor. You will get much better and much cleaner geometry with constraints that you understand and can manipulate easily. The key is to scale the drawing first, however if this doesn't work out for you. It might be helpful to turn the sketch into a block - scale it and then explode the block. Unless the images are taken at great distance with telephoto lenses, the amount of distortion makes the 'vectors' very far off. I often take pictures from 60' with a telephoto lens, import to Inventor and over draw. Years ago, I had two very proficient 'drafter / artists' take the same line drawing image and convert to dwg. One used Corel with vector tracing, the other just over drawing. The one done via vector tracing took longer to do and was not very accurate. When presented to management, they stopped suggesting we use vector tracing software. I didn't look at Paul's sketch block link - but to scale the image you have to know at least one dimension on the real object (or have a good educated guess). Calculate the scale factor (I'll call this sf) required to get the 'known' distance between two points to the correct distance. I then dimension the boundaries of the image to the origin in such a way to place a critical point relative to the origin, for example - the image of a wheel I would want the center point at the origin. Start new sketches to sketch over the image, that way you can easily turn off your image sketch without hiding geometry sketches. But designers tend to use (we hope) nice, easy measurable (manufacturable and instpectable) numbers in their dimensions, so you can use experience to reverse engineer the part. mCADForums.com is the online home for CAD professionals to discuss CAD, Design, Engineering, Technology and all things product development. Source.


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