This operation may be restricted to certain planes, or components of planes. In addition, the operation may be applied to a subset of frames within the sequence. An image must have both its frame and plane scoped to be modified. This operation may be masked, which restricts the operation to an area of the image. The mask may be inverted, brightened or dimmed. The mask input is on the side of the node. The label on the connector indicates the plane being used as a mask. The mask input can also be scaled to fit the output image’s resolution, if they differ. If this node is changing constantly, and the mask is not, it is somewhat faster to put a Scale COP down to do the resize for the mask image. Otherwise, the scale will occur every time this node cooks. The pivot offset from the newly translated image origin, around which the image is rotated and scaled. The size of the filter (normally 1). Larger values produce a more blurred transform, while smaller values do less anti-aliasing. A mask can be chosen to limit the effect of the operator to areas defined by the mask. The mask can be taken from the mask input (side input) or from the first input itself. If no mask is present, this blends the output with the input by a constant amount (0 = all input, 1 = all output). A mask can be a component of a plane or an entire plane. If a vector plane is supplied as a mask, its components are multiplied by the images' components. Turns off masking, without requiring disconnection of the mask input (useful for temporarily disabling the mask). If the mask image is a different resolution than the output image, turning on this parameter will scale the mask to the output image’s resolution. If this node is changing constantly, and the mask is not, it is somewhat faster to put a Scale COP down to do the resize for the mask image. Otherwise, the scale will occur every time this node cooks. Inverts the mask so that all fully 'masked' portions become unmasked. This saves you from inserting an Invert COP after the node with the mask. Specifies the scope for both the RGB components of Color, Alpha, and other planes. The (C)RGBA mask only affects Color components and Alpha. 'C' will toggle all the RGB components. For planes other than Color and Alpha, the plane name (plus component, if applicable) should be specified in the string field. The pulldown menu can be used to select planes or components present in this node. A plane is specified by its name. A component is specified by both its plane and component name. The '*' wildcard may be used to scope all extra planes. Any number of planes or components can be specified, separated by spaces. Allows scoping of specific frames in the frame range. This is in addition to the plane scope (so a plane at a certain frame must be both plane scoped and frame scoped to be modified). For Inside/Outside range, this parameter specifies the subrange of the sequence to scope (or unscope). This can be edited in Timeline viewer mode (⌃ Ctrl ) in viewer). For Inside/Outside Range, this parameter specifies certain number of frames before and after to slowly ramp up to scoped. The operation will be blended with its input to 'ease in' or 'ease out' the scoping effect over a number of frames. This can be edited in Timeline viewer mode (⌃ Ctrl ) in viewer). For unscoped frames, this sets the blend factor between the input and modified images. Normally this is zero (use the input image). By setting this to a non-zero value, you can make unscoped frames be 'slightly' unscoped. The value can vary between 0 (unscoped) and 1 (scoped). If the sequence range changes, enabling this parameter will adjust the subrange and frame dropoff lengths to fit the new range. Source.


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Last Modified: September 28, 2015 @ 12:00 am